Mental Health Coverage – A New Trend in Health Insurance Coverage

Mental health issues have long been a part of the medical care community as they strive to treat patients and get the mental health care that is needed. This type of coverage under healthcare plans was not even an option until as recently as in the past decade. Before that, any health insurance claims made for the treatment of mental health issues were denied. Nowadays that has changed, for most states demand that health insurance companies provide some sort of mental health coverage in their plans.

Continue reading

Mental Health Coverage – Mental Disorders Medication

Getting coverage for mental disorders can be difficult, depending on the insurance company. Many health insurance providers treat mental disorders as pre-existing conditions or simply deny all claims related to a mental disorder. Unfortunately, medication is often treated the same way. Anti-depressants such as Prozac are seen as a high-risk factor that could lead to expensive claims later on. This means that people with bulimia, panic disorder, depression, and pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder must pay the bulk of their medical expenses out-of-pocket. Many insurance companies do not offer any form of mental health coverage, and those that do charge exorbitantly high rates. If you need treatment for any kind of mental disorder, you will need to be patient and persistent.

Continue reading

Mental Health First Aid – Learn How to Help Someone Experiencing a Mental Health Problem

As a newly qualified therapist back in 2004, one area where I knew I definitely needed to know more was mental illness. I wanted to be better informed about the different common types of mental ill-health; to be able to recognise their symptoms in a client, and know what to do. This, I reasoned, would give me a better understanding of clients with a past history of mental health problems – whatever their current reason for consulting me – and would also equip me to cope if I encountered someone in serious crisis. I had heard of clients experiencing a psychotic episode during therapy : as a responsible practitioner, what should I do in that situation? I honestly wasn’t sure.

Continue reading

One Consumer’s Observations of the Mental Health Care System in America

The mental health system is a unique culture. Psychiatry itself is, unlike any other medical specialty. Mental health is an enclosed system. That means it is a world within a world. The doctors, therapists, patients, and support workers play roles. It’s a reciprocal environment. Each player in the system allows the other person the opportunity to act out his or her role. For example, the psychiatrist gives you a diagnosis that has no basis (Yes this does happen from time to time). You, the patient, having complete faith in the powers of the behavioral health system, accept this diagnosis as the gospel truth. In time, you begin to notice certain behaviors and thoughts that you believe may be a sign of your supposed illness. You return to your doctor and report these symptoms. Your psychiatrist agrees with your observations and writes them down in your medical record. He also inserts his authoritative comments to support his opinion. Therefore, both parties in the relationship are mutually validated in their roles.

Continue reading